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Counseling Services

Counseling

College can be challenging but it does not have to be overwhelming. You are not alone. Motlow Counseling Services is here to help you thrive in life and learning. We provide a safe and supportive space to address your concerns and the causes of your stress. Free and confidential counseling is available to currently enrolled students through in person or telehealth appointments.

Benefits of counseling

  • Regulate emotion
  • Reduce stress
  • Boost mood
  • Develop confidence
  • Explore priorities
  • Increase motivation
  • Strengthen relationships
  • Improve communication

Services Offered

  • Individual counseling sessions
  • Self-help resources
  • Support groups
  • Outreach and prevention
  • Programs and workshops
  • Crisis services
  • Referral for additional services
  • Consultations

CONTACT

We have counselors at each campus. For more information or to request an appointment, simply email or call.

988 Counseling LifelineCrisis Line

LOCATIONs

  • Moore: Clayton Glass Library 221
  • Smyrna: AWJ 103
  • Fayetteville: FC 112
  • McMinnville: MC 134A

Individual Counseling

In Person or Telehealth Appointments Available

Counseling Confidentiality

These confidential counseling sessions are available with a licensed mental health professional. Conversations and counseling records are not a part of your academic records and cannot be disclosed to anyone without your written consent, with the following exceptions:

  • Suspected abuse or neglect of children or vulnerable adults
  • Situations involving potential suicide or homicide
  • Mental health provider records/reports subpoenaed by a court for legal proceedings

Limits of Care

All counseling services are free to currently enrolled Motlow students. The length of treatment consists of short-term assistance. If it is determined that long-term mental health counseling services are more appropriate to address your clinical need(s), the therapist will work with you to provide a referral to a qualified mental health professional in the community.

CRISIS

If You Need Help Right Now.

  • Call 911

If you or someone you know at Motlow is experiencing a mental health crisis during hours 8AM-4:30PM, Monday- Friday, call Motlow Counseling Services for consultation and to request same day appointment 931-393-1960.

If you are considering ending your life, contact 911 immediately or go to the nearest ER.

For 24/7 resources:

988 Counseling LifelineCrisis Line

Support Groups

What is a Support Group? Why should you join?

Support Groups are a safe space to CONNECT. It is an opportunity for students to get support, meet new people, find encouragement, and consider life’s larger questions. While it is not group therapy, it:

  • Promotes personal growth and social connection
  • Improves emotional & mental wellbeing
  • Provides a regular space for building community and finding encouragement
  • The primary message is “I’m not alone in my situation”

Benefits of participating in a support group may include:

  • Feeling less lonely or lost
  • Reduces distress, depression, anxiety
  • Sharing experiences and life’s lessons
  • Learning skills to cope with challenges
  • Staying motivated
  • Gaining a sense of empowerment and hope
  • Improve understanding of a mental/emotional struggle and your own experience with it

For more information regarding your campus’ support groups times and locations, please see the monthly Counseling Services Newsletter in your Motlow email. 

SELF HELP RESOURCES

Additional resources and information to assist with living, growing and learning!  

OUTREACH

Motlow Counseling Services strives to offer outreach programs to address student stress and depression. We focus on suicide prevention, sexual violence prevention, mental health stigma, and drug and alcohol prevention efforts. Counseling Services collaborates with faculty and staff who work closely with students to offer "gatekeepers" training opportunities.

Click on the following links to learn more about: 

Suicide Prevention

Nation Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 988

988 Counseling Lifeline

College students are in a state of life transition and can be overwhelmed with new opportunities and new responsibilities. Lifestyle changes, sleep deprivation and substance abuse, can contribute to suicidal behavior.

  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death for college students
  • Approximately 1,100 college students die by suicide every year
  • 6% of college students report they have seriously considered suicide over the past year; 90%of those students created a suicide plan, 14% actually attempted suicide, and 60% continued to have thoughts of suicide

Signals

There are some behaviors that signal possible suicidal thoughts and attempts. Knowing these signals and taking action may help you save someone’s life. A person might be suicidal if they:

  • Have sadness or depression that will not go away
  • Become withdrawn or isolate themselves from friends, family, and society
  • Have difficulty going to classes
  • Become highly anxious or agitated
  • Display rage or uncontrolled anger
  • Give away prized possessions
  • Increase their use of alcohol and drugs
  • Acquire a firearm
  • Lose weight or have a decrease in appetite
  • Change their sleeping patterns, cannot sleep, or sleep all the time
  • Engage in reckless and risk-taking behavior
  • State they have no reason to live
  • Talk about or threaten suicide. (If this happens, TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION)

Remember: Any one of these signals alone doesn’t necessarily indicate a person is suicidal. However, several signals may be cause for concern. Signals are especially important if the person has attempted suicide in the past. Listen. Be a friend. Get professional help. Your actions may save a life!

Risk Factors

A variety of factors contribute to suicidal thoughts and behaviors in college students.

Depression contributes to suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts. Over a third of college students reported being so depressed they found it difficult to function. **

Hopelessness 45% of college students had felt their situation was hopeless**

Loneliness 55% of college students had felt very lonely. **

Academic Stressors can be a contributing factor to suicide. College students who have attempted suicide cite academic stress as one of the reasons for their suicide attempts. Almost half who consider suicide cite academic problems as a contributing factor.*

Financial Concerns are cited as a contributing factor by 78% of students who attempt suicide and in 31% of students who seriously consider suicide. *

Other factors such as relationship problems and issues with parents can contribute to suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

Certain populations of college students such as LGBTQ students, veterans, minority students, students who do not live on campus, and students who have known someone who died by suicide are at a higher risk for suicide and suicide attempts.

What to Do

  • ASK the question, “Do you feel like going to sleep and never waking up?”, or find someone who can. Take the risk factors and signals seriously.
  • Listen to them without judgment. Show interest in the person and be supportive of him or
  • Offer hope that there are alternatives to
  • Take Remove methods the person might use to kill him or herself. Do not leave the person alone.
  • Get Help from his or her family, friend, physician, clergy,
  • Immediately contact a person or organization that specializes in crisis intervention or suicide prevention for help.

Suicide Prevention Plan

Crisis Hotline: 988

 

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